Okavango Delta


Okavango Delta

 

 

Botswana’s famous Okavango Delta is one of the world’s last untameable wildernesses and the labyrinth of lagoons and hidden channelsHungry Hippo covering an area of over 15 000 sq km making the Okavango Delta is the largest inland delta in the world.

Until the 1950s local African farmers referred to the Okavango as a "useless swamp" and would have preferred the land Delta to be drained and used as farmland! Its headwaters start in Angola’s western highlands, with numerous tributaries joining to form the Cubango River, which then flows through Namibia where it’s called the Kavango, before finally entering Botswana as the Okavango. With it come some 11 billion cubic metres of water each year - a staggering 30 000 million litres of water per day - that drains into the Okavango through the maze of lagoons and channels before dying in the hot sands of the Kalahari Desert to the south.

Millions of years ago the Okavango used to flow into a large inland lake called Lake Makgadikgadi, the remnants of which are the Makgadikgadi Pans, and on to the sea via the Limpopo River. These days, the river's changing web of channels flow one way this year, and another the next. Sometimes called a swamp, the Okavango Delta is anything but. It is mysterious, placid, and beautiful: an ever-expanding network of increasingly smaller channels hemmed in by papyrus reeds, linking islands and palm forests.

As the Okavango delta is so large, it’s not overly infested with big animals. You’ll have to look carefully amongst the long grasses and well-watered vegetation, but there are substantial populations of elephant, lion, giraffe, wild dog, leopard, cheetah and buffalo. There’s a full range of antelope, large and small, including the unusual red lechwe, and the delta is a veritable playground for hippo and croc. Birdlife is prolific and varied, ranging from water birds to shy forest dwellers. With a menu of over 80 species of fish to choose from, including tiger and bream, it’s a favourite haunt for the famous African fish eagle.

The Okavango delta offers a number of activities: from bird watching, game viewing, simple relaxation and fishing, to flying over the landscape by small plane for a view from the air. Above all it offers the opportunity for a great wilderness experience.

Delta sunset The best way to explore is by mokoro (dug-out canoe) or by foot. Transfer in by rugged Land Rover, meet your mokoros and polers and spend a couple of days drifting through the Okavangos watery channels crammed with water lilies. Your poler will always find a safe spot to swim and cool off away from the hippo and crocs. Track spoor by foot with an experienced guide, and sleep in the bush around a fire that will keep the invisibe animals at bay.

There are also a number of remote and peaceful safari lodges and camps around the Moremi Wildlife Reserve in the middle of delta that can be reached by plane.

Tours that include the Okavango Delta. click here>>>

 

Tours that include the Okavango Delta. click here>>>

 

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